ToME: the Tales of Maj'Eyal

Everything about ToME
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 6:46 pm 
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Cornac

Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2016 8:34 pm
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A Foreword
Hello, this is my first guide, made more interesting because I myself am still learning the game! The reason I'm posting something like this is because almost every guide I come across is outdated in some form or another, and/or highly opinionated. So, this is more like an arranged collection of my notes, thoughts, opinions, and experiences picking up the game. As of the time of this writing, I have not won yet, and I play on Roguelike normal, so higher difficulty levels may not apply to the contents herein. That said, this post will be updated with: suggested information, ideas, or strategies as they're put forward. So, feel free to correct me, offer ideas or information. One last thing, I have been trying to adjust my train of thought in that there are no truly worthless skills, only ones useless to the player. For a 'worthless' skill to be useful, one needs to adjust their thinking. If I come across a skill that I cannot think of a use for, I'll note it, because that is usually indicative of poor design and necessitates another look. Also, I would mention that I will not be listing formulae or equations to determine scaling here. For the new player, casual player, or those who just hate keeping those things in mind, it just obfuscates things. I'll be giving numbers that you can use to ballpark.

Wyrmic Description
This class is certainly an interesting one, featuring a close-ranged battlecaster playstyle with a focus on melee and crowd control in particular. You'll find that very few talents are single-target, and as such benefit from being either in the thick of things, or a chokepoint just outside. As such, one may picture them as a half-draconic berserker diving in and promptly erupting into carnage. Properly kitted out of course. One of the most noticable features (some might call it a flaw), however, is the flood of class talents to spend points on. Some suffice early game with a single point and fall out of favor later, or require heavy investment to be viable for long periods of time. Which they are, unfortunately, comes down to playstyle, experience, and critters you have trouble with. One fact of the matter is, however, that you simply will not have enough skill points to get everything you might want to the power level you want it at. You will either have to sacrifice potency for versitility or vis versa. That said, almost every tree has the capacity to be pumped and be useful to SOMEONE.

Wyrmic Stats
Wyrmic's stat requirements are... odd. All of their draconic capabilities unlock from willpower, but most scale with strength and weapon damage.

  • Strength
    Weapons, damage, scaling, all of the little rings and knicknacks packrats pick up 'just in case' and then forget about, Wyrmic makes heavy use of Strength, and this should always recieve a minimum of one (1) point per level.
  • Dexterity
    Aside from a paltry amount of defense and crit shrug-off potential, wyrmics benefit almost from nothing in Dexterity. Some who prefer to stay out of the thick of it may prefer bows, though. I suggest just using gear if you MUST have dexterity for something.
  • Constitution
    There's a big divide between those that hate putting points into Con, those that swear by it. First, ignore the saves bonus. It's too low at any level to make a difference. Ever. It's the HP and reliability of skilling up Thick Skin now and then that we put points into Con for. So, 4 hp per point. At 60 points cap, that's 240 hp from constitution (remember you do start with at least 8-10) which isn't much. There are times where you will die by literally 4 hp though, or scrape by with 1. For Wyrmic though, you'll have enough points to max a third stat tree, and cunning is the only other choice, for critchance primarily.
  • Magic
    Wyrmic will, barring the questionable usage of unlocks, never have use of this stat.
  • Willpower
    Skills unlock with willpower, and your equilibrium 'pool' increases with it as well. This means more equilibruim you can use before you accrue a fail chance. I personally like to keep it roughly even with my Strength, at least in point expendature. That said, very little scales with mindpower so you don't have to max this, if you aren't going anti-magic.
  • Cunning
    Crit-chance (0.3% per), and 0.3 mindpower per point. This usually synnergizes well with maxing willpower, or point candy for extra crit%. It's either this or Con, though one could split points between the two once Strength and/or Will are maxed.
  • Luck
    A bit of extra crit-chance never hurt but unless you get a randunique with this in spades, I'd ignore it.
    Suggested Expendature
    Max STR, Max WIL, bring CON to 30 or 40, dump the rest in CUN. We bring CON up to make our early game a bit easier, and so we can max thick skin sooner, since level 10-20 you can probably eke together enough +con equipment to get at minimum an extra 10 points, but later you'll find plenty of +con artifacts and egos.

Wyrmic Class Skills
This class has a wide variety of skills and playstyles that go along with their usage. I can't speak for lategame viability at time of writing, so instead of giving 'YOU MUST PUT X POINTS IN X' of other guides, I will try to explain the skill tree, notes on each skill and the scalings thereof, and thoughts on each. Remember, well-designed talents are never worthless, only useless to players that can't make use of them.

Two-handed Assault
Two-handed weaponry boasts the highest weapon powers available, which our skills scale from, making each one more powerful through using the powerful offensive tools. The tree itself favors low point investment for wyrmic, as fully half do not synergize or scale well. These skills are stamina-based, and none of our other skills use stamina.
  • Stunning Blow: A low-cooldown debuff with a good stun chance that can last forever. Deals (123>133>141>147>152)% weapon damage which is higher than one would think given two-handed weapon's base damage, but the real pleasure is the (3>4>5>6>7) rounds of stun. This means that from 4/5 onward you can stunlock. The 7 rounds of stun and an extra 5% weapon damage though isn't worth another class point though, so I would advise against going 5/5.
  • Fearless Cleave: A high-cost but 0 cool down attack that could be used every single turn at great cost to stamina. This deals damage in an arc of 3 in the direction you choose after taking a step. If you don't move, it's underwhelming at only 61% but deals 122% (twice the minimum) to 3 things at once. This is a one-point early game investment generally, as we have a skill which scales better, gives a passive benefit, and doesn't require movement (Ice Claw). That said, Fearless Cleave's use comes as a gap closer with AI that tries to back away, as this lets you move and attack in the same turn, pursuing them.
  • Death Dance: Many wyrmics will be in a situation where they're surrounded more than once. Death Dance is actually the only attack that will deal lethal damage in a burst in every direction wyrmics get access to. That said, the bleed means something has to be adjacent to you 5 turns and live to be truly effective, and 5 class points to go from 173% to 213% damage is underwhelming when we're talent starved. I myself do not use death dance past early game, and unbind it from hot keys as if I am surrounded and have nothing else to spend a turn on, something is wrong. If you find yourself using this skill and then teleporting out or bolting, however, it can make a good harrier skill.
  • Execution: Execution is amazing as either a 1 point skill, or more in depth 5/5 investment, to taste. At a moderate cooldown of 8 rounds and a somewhat expensive stamina cost, this skill is notable not for it's capacity to deal grevious harm to already weakened creatures (though it is there), but for the ability to critical hit on command. Many excellent critical hit effects are available on ego items, artifacts, and random artifacts, and being able to set them off at will is powerful, even if the attack does not have your usual crit multiplier.

Shield-Offense
Since Wyrmic benefits well from being tanky, shields are an obvious choice, and this tree can make a big difference in the effectiveness of your melee capabilities, to make up for giving up the higher base damage of two-handers. It does boast a stun, though not as long as two-handed, but I have heard it synergizes very well with the Venom skill tree. I cannot confirm this as of 1.4.x myself.

  • Shield Pummel: A low cooldown low cost attack on par with Stunning Blow in terms of stamina and cooldown. This skill is a double attack, striking with your shield (which can have nasty on hit effects too). The second attack is stronger, and if both hit, they are stunned. This skill is usually not taken 5/5, though, because of how the stun scales. At level 2 and 4, the stun increases to 3 and 4 rounds respectively. Damage scales nicely as well, dealing (133>146>157>166>173)% on the first attack and (162>180>193>204>214)% on the second.
  • Riposte: If you utilize block as much as possible, riposte can really shine, but even if you only use it occasionally the passive is solid at a single point. Generally, however, you won't want to be spending enough time in pure melee to make use of this, and therefor it will not usually merit investment beyond one point. Riposte offers extra counterstrike duration and strikes, and counterstrike by itself doubles your damage as it is. If you do utilize shields as much as possible however, riposte offers an increasing crit chance on the counterstrike at (12>15>17>19>22)% that scales with your dexterity, and 4/5, increases the number of counterattacks by 1, and the duration thereof.
  • Shield Slam: Combines the offense of an attack with the defense and counterstrike opportunity of blocking. This high cooldown and hgih cost ability allows us to attack 3 times at (43>56>67>76>83)% shield damage, and immediately go into a block. This can function with 1 point, but some shields do have good damage output and on-hit effects. I would personally only invest a single point here, and increase it if you find yourself using it often.
  • Assault: A moderate-high cost but low cooldown attack which, if it connects, will yield an immediate TWO critical hits from your main weapon. This skill is arguably better than Execution for this reason, if not the lower cost / cooldown. The scaling is not shabby but not great either. If you invested in Shield Pummel, I would not spend further points in Assault, because it functions very well with just 1. Otherwise, the shield attack and two main attacks all scale at (123>133>141>147>152)% damage. Assuming they all hit, this means you'd deal 1.5x shield damage, and 3x weapon damage, along with the on-crit procs of your weapon, for a total of a potential 4.5x damage attack every 6 rounds. Depending on your equipment / style, this can be well worth investing in over Shield Slam.

Combat Veteran
This tree gets a lot of hate in existing guides, and people tend to treat it as a dump-tree. This is understandable as almost everything it offers can be attained better elsewhere. That said, this depends upon your personal preference, and your style. Since these are all passive, at least it won't be filling your already crowded hotbar, and some can yield a good single point investment return.

  • Quick Recovery: Increase your stamina regeneration by (0.6>1.2>1.6>2.1>2.5) points / turn. Less than 1/4th of our total potential talents use stamina. Very little investment to yield return is to be had beyond the first point for Wyrmic.
  • Fast Metabolism: Increase your life regeneration by (3>4.3>5.5>6.5>7.5>) life/turn. This is significantly more helpful than Quick Recovery, but it is outshined by the Fungal tree, once proper invested. That said, the early game difference is positively staggering with just a single point, which speeds your regeneration by a staggering 12x base. For one point (two total) in the class tree, this can be worth it alone early on, but you won't notice it that much later.
  • Spell Shield: This one has a lot of hate because of the rediculous degree the bonuses are nerfed when applied, and wyrmic meshes VERY well with antimagic. If you aren't running Anti-magic, or feel you desperately need unholy amounts of spell save, this skill offers a BASE value of +(9>18>27>36>45) to spell saves. The actual number that you'll end up with is muchmuchmuch lower, due to how hard the formulae hit bonuses to saves. Still between this and decent equipment, you'll make most saves when they count.
  • Unending Frenzy: This skill does wonders to replenish stamina, especially for high fatigue tanks. Problem is, Wyrmics again don't use their stamina much. I would not invest in this skill as part of any 'build' but only on a very serious as-needed basis. Still, offers 5 stamina per kill by any means with a single point invested, and those kills can come from any means, so if you ARE highly using your stamina skills and manage to run out in an extended area where you can't rest (Nur), this MIGHT help. I'd probably just float the point though.

Sand Drake Aspect
This tree is one of the most up-front powerful and useful. There is no skill here which cannot be helpful. This earth-aligned tree thematically and mechanically fits very well with wyrmics who favor melee as their primary source of damage, and offers healing, high damage, blinds, AOE attacks, and battlefield arrangement both predictable and unpredictable. A careful wyrmic could, in theory, build entirely around this tree, and melee options, with a few supporting skills elsewhere. It also offers crit-chance and physical resist passively, up to 10% resist physical.

  • Swallow: I truly wish this skill was named 'Devour'. This skill offers an instant, mid-battle heal based upon the level of what you swallow, an execution attack, nature damage, and the hilarious mental image of just running around nomming everything you meet. Swallow will deal (206>225>239>252>263)% weapon damage as nature damage instead (On-hit effects apply, though the damage is not converted), and will attempt to instantly kill and eat anything the attack hits that is, or brings below (14>19>23>25>28)% of their max health. This includes undead horrors that rely on hundreds of points of below 0 life. With a low cost and cooldown, I personally love this skill. As an added bonus, it offers +(3>6>8>10>12)% crit rate on physical and mental attacks for each point.
  • Quake: This is a high cooldown, low cost, high damage AOE with several interesting effects. First, it deals (171>188>201>212>221)% weapon damage in a radius of (2>3>4>4>5) around you. It then provides a knockback of up to 3 tiles, repositions you randomly within the radius of the attack, and will SCRAMBLE THE TERRAIN within the area, in any non-fixed environment. This can alter lines of sight, lines of effect, entomb you or others, open rooms, or close them. Don't use this without a pickaxe. This is, however, a potent method of changing an engagement and a great attack too. What's more, it can crit.
  • Burrow: Incredibly powerful even with a single point, and perhaps outright broken when invested in, burrow is both an incredible utility and buff, which can become instantaneous. First, this skill allows you to dig automatically in any stone, sand, or dirt wall that can be dug in a single turn while active. This doesn't work in vaults, forests, fungal forests, or fixed terrain. Second, you ignore (19>22>25>27>29) points of enemy armor, and (10>11>13>14>15)% of their physical resistence. The cooldown and duration increases with levels, ranging from a cooldown of (32>20>17>15>14), and a duration of (3>4>6>7>8) turns. At 4/5, it also becomes an instant-cast. It is, however, slightly expensive to use in equilibrium. This skill, along with Quake, are very highly geared toward melee.
  • Sand Breath: Moderate cost and cooldown, Sand Breath offers a powerful AOE blind that hits far more often than not, and isn't bad damage either. It hits in a cone of (5>6>8>9>10), and deals (117>153>179>201>220) physical damage at 60 strength, and scales with your strength. The blind extends from 3 turns to 4 at 4/5. Do bear in mind that you can activate Burrow and ignore armor and physical resist to help pierce through.

Fire Drake Aspect
Surprisingly enough only 2 of the 4 skills in this tree offer fire damage, and one of those two deals scratch damage. People generally only actually level Bellowing Roar and leave the rest of the tree alone. This is not especially surprising because they aren't up-front powerful. Still, this tree offers a powerful AOE confusion, healing, knockback, fire damage, and up to 20% fire resist.

  • Wing Buffet: Considered tax by most, this skill offers very little up front. Enemies can resist knockback, and the knockback isn't very far either. Still, each point offers +4 physical power and +4 accuracy passively. This skill in my opinion is best left as a 1/5, because the passive is unremarkable due to diminishing returns, and the knockback strength does not scale. Still, the skill is not as worthless as one might think. True, the 135% weapon damage (167% at 5/5) in a radius of 3 (6 at 5/5) is not particularly impressive, and many things you NEED far away from you have knockback resistence, BUT what this does excel at is buying a few turns, or more importantly, possibly opening up a path for an escape. This skill is BEST thought of as an AOE heave that can crit and deal damage, and used similarly. It would be far more useful if the knockback strength scaled.
  • Bellowing Roar: A medium cost high cooldown AOE confuse that lasts 3 turns, and deals some impressive damage in early / midgame, but the damage itself falls off later. Still early on it can clear rooms and trash, and is a good early investment. The confuse is good throughout, too. The radius is impressive as well, at (3>4>6>7>8), which can send an entire horde running about willy nilly for a few moments. This is useful for anyone, really. It is commonly maxed, and maxed earlier on where the damage shines the most.
  • Devouring Flame: Almost universally hated, considered worthless AND useless both, like a Glacial Vapour for wyrmic. They're right. As an attack. The thing with Devouring Flame is, don't consider it an attack. Think of it as a debuff. First, it won't hit you, so you can drop it at your feet and ensure something doesn't just run out of it. Second, this can last a pretty long time at 5/5 (10 turns, half its cooldown), and the damage scales with Mindpower, though poorly. Finally, it will heal you for some of the damage dealt, which means it takes 1 turn to set up, offers DoT effectively, and free healing. It's essentially like using Glacial Vapour while in Shiver form, but you don't actually need to be in the midst of it to heal. The initial radius of 2 is not that helpful at 1/5 though, but it can increase up to 5. Instead, this shines best when used on a large clustering of creatures who'll be in place awhile. For example, while confused, or stuck outside a choke-point. It can offer an extra 15-20 healing even at just 1/5 per turn, and that only goes up a LOT as you invest in it. This is an AOE buff / debuff, not an attack.
  • Fire Breath: The reason people tend to put a point in devouring flame in the first place. Fire Breath sticks to fire's usual DoT method of delivery. This little sucker can grow into a 10-radius cone of 25% chance 3 round stun, and deals more damage than any other breath weapon in total. For comparison, Sand Breath deals generally 2/3 as much as Fire Breath. Because it's DoT, this is best used as an engagement, so the damage is ticking while you're layering on the pain with other things. As an important side note, there's a misunderstanding about the flameshock aspect of Fire Breath. This effect is added on TOP of the normal effects, using a low-damage flameshock effect that layers on top of the regular burning. This means it remains useful and potent against stun-immune enemies. It also delivers a substantial chunk of it's burn damage on cast, rather than over time.

Cold Drake Aspect
Cold damage is not an uncommon resist, but what's important to note is that some of these skills deal ICE damage, which comes with an inherent chance to freeze. This tree offers slows, a self buff which can offer a good extra spike of armor and damage to attackers, battlefield control, and freezes, which can take threats out of the fight for a few possibly crucial turns. A max of 20% cold resistence is possible, and offers bonuses to saves passively.

  • Ice Claw: This is a short(er) range low cost, moderately low cooldown ice-damage cone. At 1/5, it functions much like Fearless Cleave without the move, offers +4 to all your saves per point, and scales very well with weapon damage at (168>195>215>233>248)% in a cone of (1>1>2>3>3). This has a chance of freezing everyone hit, and can therefor take high threat targets down on the priority list for a few turns. Frozen enemies can be attacked for a reduced amount, or worked around to deal with others. In single combatant situations, it's free turns for cooldowns.
  • Icy Skin: The only sustain out of our drake talents. At a low sustain cost, you can keep this on almost constantly for almost the entire game, with only early game offering a threat of failure from equilibrium. It offers an armor bonus which scales with your mindpower (not that much though), and not insubstantial cold damage to anything attacking you, which stacks with other effects from equipment. Best of all, it also increases your max health, so this skill is useful throughout the game. The life increase scales with talent level, but the retaliation and armor scale with mindpower. The life increase runs from (3>5>8>10>13)%, the armor, however, can range from 9 at 5/5 to easily 14 at higher mindpower, or even more. It doesn't scale amazingly well, but every bit helps, and for such a low sustain, it doesn't hurt.
  • Ice Wall: This is your battlefield control, and can block off choke points for a few turns to let you make an escape, rope out a boss to deal with the chaff (or vis versa), and runs a 25% chance to freeze anything other than the user or allies near one of the walls. Best of all, it runs that check for each wall nearby. It begins at a short, 4 turn barrier 3 tiles wide, that deals a paltry 3-4 ice damage per wall tile. At 5/5, however, this becomes a 9 wide barricade lasting 9 turns, and the range of each wall's attack increasing to 2 tiles at 4/5. This means that at any given time an enemy in the middle of the wall is within range of 5 ice tiles, each hitting it with a 25% chance to freeze each time they take damage from it. The damage itself is not the point, this is for crowd control, battlefield control, and an 'OH CRAP' button. It's transparent, but blocks enemies and projectiles.
  • Ice Breath: This lovely little doozy of a breath weapon comes equipped with ice damage that scales with strength, can crit, and runs about on par with Sand Breath in terms of damage output. What shines, however, is that it has the standard 25% chance to freeze, and it deals a 20% slow for 3 turns on anything caught in the blast. This can be a great closer when you need to bolt, or an engage to try to squeeze out another round.

Storm Drake Aspect
Storm Drake gets even less love than Fire Drake, which is understandable as only one of the skills actually shines, and that skill is right at teir 1. Still, this offers up to 20% lightning resist, passive movement speed boost (a big one), an omnidirectional damage peel, stun, knockback, and AOE dazes. One of the biggest weaknesses of this tree, however, are long cooldowns.

  • Lightning Speed: The star of Storm Drake, and thank goodness it's not buried in the tree because people only generally 3/5 it in guides anyway. This little doozy is great with 1 point, or at 5. For each point, you get ROUGHLY 10% extra movement speed passively. It caps at 50% at 5/5, but it's generally something like 9-12% per level. When activated, however, it transforms you into lightning, blitzing your movespeed up 496% to 837% faster for (2>3>3>4>4) turns. It gives you 30% physical resistance during that time, and sets your lightning resistance as high as it can go. If you act outside of movement, however, it ends the effect early. This is basically an equilibrium-funded movement infusion of the gods, because in 4 turns, you can move I believe 36 tiles, as long as you aren't caged in. This is an amazing disengage or engagement, and is useful throughout the game.
  • Static Field: Nobody likes this skill, despite a rather unique mechanism. Static field will deal damage dependent upon the current health of what it hits, and it hits a radius of (1>3>4>6>7) It'll deal less damage to rares, bosses, etc. The things you really need to blitz down as fast as possible. Depending upon their health, this skill can be debilitating or useless. It also does moderate fixed lightning damage on top of the percentaged damage. It scales from mindpower, and crits with mental. The percentage drain cannot be resisted with lightning, physical, all resist, etc. It can, however, be saved against with a phys save. It deals full drain to the chaff, 2/3 to elites, 1/2 to bosses and uniques, and 1/3 to elite bosses. At capped Willpower and 50~ cunning, but no other boosts, the base drain is 16.6% down to 6.6% and 54 lightning damage at level 1, but gets up to 28.7% for normals and down to 11.5% for elite bosses at 5/5, and deal an extra 112.8 lightning damage. on top of that. This means you can CHUNK an entire room of high health enemies, possibly the single highest damaging attack in your arsenal. For example, let's say you're up against, say, a randunique just cropped up and has a nasty 2,500 health. Well he's about to take 496 points of damage, and everythign around him is softened up too. A great engagement, and this is without any power boosts from gear, prodigies, whatever. Still, the later you use this in a fight, the worse it is, so unless you engage with it, it has little usage.
  • Tornado: An interesting skill for pointing at one thing in particular and saying "YOU! YES YOU! - YOU! And all of your little friends too!" The tornado is a short/shortish range 'projectile' that will track its target, knock aside and damage antyhing that gets in the way, explodes for damage AGAIN, and stuns. The tornado scales from mindpower, and the stun chance is mindpower VS phys save. The damage, however, ranges from (Assuming minimum values to buy the skill) about 21 for things in the path, then a radius 2 explosion of 42 physical + 42 lightning at 1/5, to 48 for things caught in the path and a radius 4 explosion of 93 lightning + 93 physical, and a 6 turn stun for the target. It scales decently well with mindpower, too. At 60 will and 50 cunning, it'll do 68 to anything in it's path, and 127 damage of phys and lightning. Many things will be hit for both, and knockbacks aplenty. The range and radius of the explosion all increase with investment. The range increases at a rate of (3>4>5>6>6), the explosion radius at (2>2>3>3>4). Generally I would use this on the most threatening thing in a crowd for the stun, but the travel path and explosion is a decent AOE in itself. It doesn't affect the caster either, so this may be worth using, and then running out of the scattered group with lightning speed.
  • Lightning Breath: Of all the breath weapons this is perhaps the most underwhelming. The usual cost and cooldowns, with variable damage for each thing hit between 100 and 300 damage. Because of how lightning damage works, this will usually hit in the range of 200 or so, give or take 50, putting it on par with the other breaths. The effect, however, is a mindpower-scaling daze chance. That's... kind of it. Daze is a nice status effect when you can keep applying it, but since anything from burning ticks to poison to something looking at them funny will end it, I don't care for this breath weapon. From my understanding, this is not an engagement tool. It is not a tool to be used mid-fight. It's to be used just before you disengage and flee or reposition around another choke-point. Because of the daze, do not use this with venom or fire breath until they've finished ticking.

Venom Drake Aspect
Another tree highly regarded, along with Sand Drake, and is one of the more common focuses. This tree offers our standard 1% resist per point in the tree (capping at 20% again), mind power, and it also offers solid damage, an infrequently resisted element, and a very nice debuff attached to the skills. It also has a nuke-attack. For battlefield control, engagements, and utility however, this tree lacks.

  • Acid Spray: For somethis is the one point wondertax that helps out early on, and is then forgotten about. It scales with mindpower, and the base damage isn't terrible either. The range increases with each level (5>6>7>7>8), with a low cooldown of 6, and becomes a beam at 4/5. Between 1 and 5, it increases in power about 2.5x. It also comes with a nice 25% chance 3 turn disarm, which can render some combatants harmless if it actually works, but can't be relied upon.
  • Corrosive Mist: A fan favorite, this is a caster-centered AOE that follows you, deals acid damage each turn they stay in the mist, and it also debuffs their armor, defense, and accuracy. The damage is never quite spectacular, but the radius increases to (2>3>4>4>5), and the debuff will last (2>3>3>3>4) turns, and I believe it will be reapplied as long as they stay in the mist. The debuff itself scales from mindpower, as does the duration (though I'm not entirely sure how, these numbers were taken at stat caps). The actual debuff seems to increase in power 2x base from levels 1 and 5. At a moderate cost and cooldown, this is a good damage-ticker, and helps you in melee, both to hit, and to avoid being hit.
  • Dissolve: I'm fairly sure entire characters have been built around this skill. Dissolve attacks 4 times, dealing (35>46>54>61>67)% weapon damage as acid damage. At levels 2, 4, and 5, one of those attacks gains a 25% blind chance. This means 3 out of 4 of those attacks will have a blind chance at 5/5. Dissolve will take offhand weapons into account, and SUPPOSEDLY shields, but I have not noticed the latter myself. I have heard that decked out and at high levels, dissolve can deal over 1,000 damage in one turn reliably. For reference, assuming all four attacks hit, it deals a max of (140>184>216>244>268)% weapon damage, but deals on-hit procs each hit, and can crit.
  • Corrosive Breath: Like all the other breath weapons, this can extend to a radius 10 cone of good damage, a little more potent than Sand Breath, but without annoyingly common resists. It scales from strength, and runs a scaling, mindpower based 3-turn disarm chance similar to Lightning Breath's daze. This is useful for groups of weapon-reliant enemies that you're about to face-tank. A decent method of engagement.

Combat Techniques
At a category point and class points that may be better spent elsewhere, this is a very... disrespected unlock choice, and some might even criticize it should be removed or replaced with something more useful. Still, for those wyrmics that are preferring to instead augment melee abilities with draconic abilities rather than vis versa, this may be for you.

  • Rush: An increasing range and decreasing cooldown with point investment mean that for regular use it makes a poor 1 point wonder, but for occasional use this is a decent one for some mobility when you're trying to save infusions or lightning speed for an escape. The restrictions, low damage, and daze are mean that this skill doesn't really shine compared to some others.
  • Precise Strikes: This scales with your dexterity, which wyrmics otherwise don't increase save perhaps to equip a dagger in an offhand, reduces attack speed, and boosts accuracy and crit-chance. While these effects would concievably stack with the passives offered by the teir 1 drake aspect skills, there's no real reason to worth a category point and skill points to raise this to the point of being useful. Still, if you have the tree already unlocked and plan to be a diet-wyrm wyrmic, this could help shore up the failings.
  • Perfect Strike: A massive accuracy steroid, and blindfighting for a short duration. High cooldown, not insignificant cost, but granting up to 100 accuracy, it pretty much ensures that barring evasion, you will hit. Admittedly I don't really see a benefit to this, save perhaps to make absolutely sure that Dissolve does it's job beyond all shadow of doubt.
  • Blinding Speed: OK, now this one might be why people would ever unlock this tree. Blinding speed offers a short-term global speed increase at a significant chunk of stamina and a boggling cooldown. You can get at 5/5 up to 45% global speed boost, which makes your faster movespeed from lightning speed all the more crazy. Still, I do not personally see a need or use for it, given all the other tools available.

Higher Draconic Abilities
The commonly unlocked tree and point sink for our already strained pool. It's a bit of a mixed bag of useful to useless, player by player, but it seems to be one of the most commonly heavy investment trees. For good reason too. This offers resists, penetrations, passive stat boosts, cooldown reductions for breath weapons, a nice attack, a potentially potent debuff, and a passive attack speed boost.

  • Prismatic Slash: Need damage, don't care what element it comes from, and like big booms? Max this. Like extra attack speed? Max this. Point-starved and playing almost exclusively at range with your high movespeed and long range AOEs? Tax. It does scale nicely, however, at (161>178>191>202>211)% weapon damage, with a burst of a random element in a radius around you, in an also not insignificant amount. The real hilight though is the extra passive 12% physical and mental attack speed it offers.
  • Venomous Breath: This one has people both proclaiming it to be great, and others to be horrible. Venemous breath is a low(er) damage DoT that cripples. It lasts a flat 6 turns, but with scaling damage based on strength, and a mind-based crit chance like other breath weapons. It deals this as nature-damage, and each point gives 3% nature resist, and 4% nature damage, totalling out at +15% resist nature, +20% nature damage delt. At 60 strength, with 5/5 this deals 70 nature damage per turn for 6 turns. Or if you prefer, it totals to 420 total nature damage, incurring a 23% chance to fail any action beyond basic attacks and movement. A fantastic opener to a fight you can't burst down.
  • Wyrmic Guile: This gives us a free bonus of 2 cunning points per talent level up to 10, reduces breath cooldowns for up to half (6) at 5/5, 56% knockback resistence, and 30% stun / blind resist. There is... no reaosn not to cap this if you have the points, but nothing you can't live without. Still, those breath cooldown cuts help.
  • Chromatic Fury: OK this one is a tiny bit underwhelming for a tier 4, but only a tiny bit. You gain 2% extra damage and 4% penetration in cold, fire, acid, lightning, and physical up to 10% and 20% respectively. The passive for this skill is a POTENT and POWERFUL...0.5% extra resist for those elements for each point in chromatic fury. Or +2.5% resists. No, no I don't know why you'd bother with 2.5% either. I think the passive was probably 1% but it got nerfed or something? Personally I'd rework it and make it activatable. Keep the damage and pen as passive bonuses, but make it so the next skill you use after activation gives you 1/1/2/3/3 wards of the associated element for a few turns.

Wyrmic Generics
Wow you're still reading this? Alright. Wyrmics can be a little generic-starved but nowhere near as much as class skills. Of particular note, they start with Fungus unlocked, Harmony available, and Call of the Wild unlocked as well. Fungus is incredibly potent once it gets set up with regeneration infusions, and other trees they start with access to have their high points too. For the purposes of this guide, I will NOT be going into anti-magic, or any other tree which the wyrmic does not begin the game with access to. Nor will I be discussing race trees, as I find race to be a matter of personal taste anyway. As a final note, you won't have that many spare generics just investing in what's already unlocked, if you have a race tree you choose to use talent up heavily (such as Dwarven 'Money is Power'). Baring sources of free generics, you may find yourself having to sacrifice something to cover another priority.

Combat Training
As melee-casters, we will undoubtedly be relying upon this tree to eat our generic points. I'm always personally torn between pumping points into here and getting the other trees set up early. Still, it's a matter of taste, as long as you consider what you're experiencing, and what areas you're failing in.

  • Thick Skin: I think everyone knows what this one is, but for first time players who... have either cheated this class unlocked or are just browsing, Thick Skin offers 4% to 15% Resist All, and is gated behind ungodly amounts of Constitution. Most do not pump con enough to fill this tree fully, but instead get con up to a base level and then just equip gear which provides boosts when it's time to level this up. Resist All globally reduces all damage you take, provided that damage does not have penetration attached to it. This goes from physical damage to blight, to darkness, to mind. What have you. That's helpful for everything.
  • Armor Training: As melee-ranged battlecasters with little use for stamina, there is almost no reason not to wear the thickest, heaviest, most monstrous piece of armor you can strap on. We want massive armor. We want shields (if you're into that kind of thing). We want to be able to stand there and cackle at the horde clawing at the metal before raining down death and destruction, or just devouring them wholesale. The actual scaling numbers aren't all that important, because this is one that wyrmic almost always wants to max outright, and get to 3 ASAP. Still, they offer extra hardiness, armor points, and crit reduction, as long as you're wearing heavy or massive armor. Which you should be. Tankier is better.
  • Combat Accuracy: Some people max this, some don't. I find a minimum of 2/5 is absolutely necessary, with the rest coming from skills or equipment. Still, your skills CAN miss, and some reward hitting more frequently than not (dissolve). I would reccomend only putting points in this when you notice you start missing at critical moments, or too often for comfort. A viable tactic is floating a few points here until you get something with accuracy you'll be sticking beside for a long time.
  • Weapon Mastery: From the As of axes, Cs of clubs, and Ss of swords, wyrmics spend most of their time whacking things over the head with something sharp and/or heavy as much as possible. This skill helps make sure that you can do that. Since it makes weapons stronger, it also makes our SKILLS stronger. (I think.) So max this.
  • Dagger Mastery: OK-- remember what I said about dexterity? It fits here. THAT SAID! If you truly honest to gods want to use daggers, consider dumping CON or CUN and raise DEX and this as needed. Why would you do such a thing? Offhand damage, to stack with Dissolve, and handy stats on daggers you actually plan on using. Still, I'd say 'Don't do it.'

Call of the Wild
Just because it's bog-standard for wilders doesn't mean it's useless. Still, this isn't commonly invested in too heavily. It's a utility tree, plain and simple.

  • Meditation: This skill gives us passive equilibrium 'regeneration', or active, if in a hurry. One point should suffice for 9 out of 10 players, but if you find yourself darting out of battle with high equilibrium and not much time before the next engagement, it may be worth pointing a bit. It'll raise healmod too. Since it's instant, this can be turned off immediately if trouble comes up.
  • Nature's Touch: Here's our one direct heal, and it can be shared! Some people only put a single point in this and let scaling take over from there, especially since the Fungal tree gives us... other options in health recovery. Still, it's to taste, and not insignificant at early levels. Always worth at least one point.
  • Earth's Eyes: Nature's Vision spell, with a meditation-enabled short range ESP. The usefulness is limited, but can be worth a point and set to auto-use when enemies aren't around with meditation enabled to make mapping take less time than just pressing 'Z' and hoping something doesn't eat you.
  • Nature's Balance: Investment of this is to taste. If you find yourself staying in fights long enough that cooldowns become a problem, or get chain stunned but somehow this doesn't get included and you NEED to do something, this can reset your various talents' cooldowns. I wouldn't take it past 4/5 though, since there are no (to my knowledge) tier 6 talents, but it does cooldown a 7th random nature gift.

Fungus
Fungus doesn't look too awesome at first glance but, then that's always been true of fungus. It disguises how helpful... and deadly it can be. The industry standard is a 12 point investment here.

  • Wild Growth: A 15 equilibrium sustain that you want on 24/7. Between this and Icy Skin, you'll probably have a fail chance on everything early game, but it is worth it with just a few points. What this does, is on top of enabling the rest of the tree for use, it extends the effectiveness of regeneration effects. Like Regen infusions. At 5/5, it will make a regen infusion heal 10 rounds instead of 5, for the same amount. What that means is, it doubles their effectiveness. Some healing infusions also have a 10 round cooldown or so...
  • Fungal Growth: This is a one-point wonder honestly, but it can help early game with Nature's Touch, and Swallow. It adds a bonus regen effect (that's also affected by Wild Growth) for a percentage of the heal. Now this is important: This regen BLOCKS regen infusions, BUT you can right click them to cancel a lesser regeneration instantly, without taking a turn.
  • Ancestral Growth: From a single point in, this skill is incredibly useful. From 5 points in with a good mindpower, it's broken. What this little beauty does, is it makes regeneration effects decrease your equilibrium as well (rather significantly) in battle, and when they're applied in the first place, they will give you a great big chunk of a turn. No I don't know how getting PART of a turn works, but people swear by it. When this and Wild Growth are maxed, you are able to treat regeneration infusions as almost instant, and keep them going perpetually with 1 or 2, which sucks away equilibrium, and keeps your life nice and full. Still gotta worry about burst damage though.
  • Sudden Growth: Typically a one-point wonder, if you don't have a race tree this may be worth using for more. What this does is that it will take your current regen rate, and give it to you 6x over at once. This means you can, for example, take the full dose of a regen infusion at once, and still have the rest of the turns ticking down. If maxed, this will mean about 10 turns worth of regeneration in an instant.

Harmony
This is an odd bit of utility that you can get unlocked without a cat point if you repeat the action that unlocked the class in the first place. Not very highly regarded, and not many people use it. It does have some pretty interesting uses, however.

  • Waters of Life: Poisons and diseases can become pretty deadly as levels go on, or you've just escaped something horrible and are watching in horror as you count down to death. This will make the damage turn into healing (proccing Fungal Growth possibly?) but retain the other negative effects. Nice as an emergency measure but not otherwise noteworthy.
  • Elemental Harmony: Temporary buffs when you get hurt by base elements for a few turns. This passive is somewhat difficult to use intentionally, especially as Wyrmic skills no longer affect their casters. Still, none of them are outright useless, even at one point, but they are unreliable. Since this must be sustained, this also limits it's usefulness even if you chose to put 5 points in. Supposing you did max it, however, the duration of each buff and the magnitude would increase. Whether it be gaining 44% global speed from fire, 14 armor from cold, +5 to all stats from lightning, +16 life regen from acid, or +13 resist all from nature, any of the common spells or on-hit effects can usually proc SOMETHING, but actually using it is largely limited to activating it and forgetting it.
  • One with Nature: A moderately high cost long cooldown activatable that lowers a few infusion cooldowns slightly, and removes infusion saturation effects. I do not personally see a big use for this, given at max level it only lowers cooldowns by 3 turns, but it'll cover all of your infusions. Still not useless at one point, as it IS an instant cast, and you can use it between regen infusions to keep their cooldowns low.
  • Healing Nexus: Now this one is situationally useful, but the situations it's useful in are distressingly hilarious. Healing nexus is an AOE debuff that prevents all healing of those affected, and instead heals YOU for a portion of the blocked healing. Not too terribly many enemies heal overmuch, but some... some are just hilarious, like the Weirdling Beast, who heals almost constantly, for staggering amounts. Each stolen heal recovers equilibrium as well, and points increase the radius and duration of the effect, as well as the magnitude. At max points, this talent will heal you for 95% of the stolen heal effects. I do not personally know if that's worth it in the long run, but even just a single point can screw some enemies over.

Cunning Survival
Since escorts offer three of the four big skills here and none of them are entirely required, this is usually not unlocked, which also saves in generic points.

  • Heightened Senses: This lets us detect and disarm traps at 3/5, I'm not too clear on the actual mechanics there, though. What this is used for primarily is to see further out of our range than we might with just light range. Infravision basically, which can extend almost to the default max range if levelled highly.
  • Charm Mastery: If you find yourself making heavy use of torques, wands, or totems, this can decrease the cooldowns to something reasonable. Also works for activatables. Ranges from 11% reduction to 40% reduction. (IE, 30 seconds becomes 12. Of note, 30 turns is the typical cooldown on a psychoport torque...)
  • Piercing Sight: Increases stealth and invis detection significantly, and it scales with cunning. Even a single point is amazing, and should always be taken at least once by an escort.
  • Evasion: This activatable skill consumes nothing more than a turn to use it, and grants a miss-chance based upon cunning and dexterity to avoid damage entirely, as well as a defense steroid. The duration depends on willpower. Since Dex is not a common wyrmic stat, and Cun is a luxury or candy-stat, this means it's not usually worth heavy investment.

Intermission
Wow so this far and we've just covered skills and impressiosn they offer, as well as some very rough ideas of what they might be like to skill and use. Let's remember numbers aren't dead set, and the wiki is a good source for formulae and hard numbers. Still, almost everything scales nicely enough for its purpose. So if you're still reading rather than just hunting, let's take a moment to go to the lobby and have ourselves a snack.

Back yet? Good. Following this look at the skills we have at our disposal, I'll be discussing some theoretical playstyles (I say theoretical as I've not yet won with any, even commonly accepted viable ones) which should logically be viable. I make no promises of optimal however.


Last edited by Snow on Mon Feb 08, 2016 5:12 am, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 6:47 pm 
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Cornac

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Wyrmic Potential Playstyles
This section is likely where people new to the class probably want a simple, easy guide of how to make a character and carry it to victory. This will not be that guide. Instead, as with the rest of this guide, I will present several ideas and synergies readily apparent that may work to varrying degrees of effectiveness. I would appreciate if more experienced players or enthusiasts would comment and offer meaningful input on anything that jumps out at them, and I may update this guide to include such comments or paraphrased ideas / suggestions. Once again, these are ideas, but not iron-clad and certainly not taken to victory. They will not include nitty gritty details such as escort rewards, spare points from unlocks and events, or equipment making a build viable where it otherwise would not be.

Generalist
Thematic builds are rarely optimal, and only optimisticly viable sometimes. A more pragmatic approach will grab anything that suits their playstyle or needs and neglect the rest in favor of 'the best' or 'the easiest'. Here's an idea for an inexperienced wyrmic player. It has been suggested this particular build may not be entirely viable, but no reason why has been submitted yet. Review the comments, and use this as a suggestion rather than a rule.

  • Two-handed: 4/1/1/1
    For stun-locks, and guaranteed crits on demand. We're running two-handeds for the lovely base weapon damage, to make our skills pack a bigger punch.
  • Combat Veteran:1/1/0/0/
    Early game survivability, and a bit less time resting between engagements. +3 life regen is astronomical compared to 0.25, and early on it's easy to grab. Later it isn't all that great.
  • Sand: 5/1/1/5
    We max devour for the crit chances, and to have a nice execute on a low cooldown. Helps keep equilibrium low too. Sand breath is for AOE blinds and decent damage. Quake and Burrow aren't useless at 1 point in either, though they don't shine very much and it's easy not to use either.
  • Fire: 1/5/0/0
    AOE confusions for all! Wing buffet of situational use, but easy to forget about.
  • Cold: 1/5/0/0
    Turn on icy skin and leave it there. Ice claw makes a nice early game attack to deal with groups or while things are on cooldown.
  • Storm: 5/0/0/0
    Run fast, activate to run ludicriously fast. Good from the first point and only gets better. Utility really. We max it for 50% extra movespeed.
  • Venom: 1/1/5/5
    Acid spray is a nice early game option for taking care of things kiting you a bit, Corrosive Mist is helpful but a more conservative Icy Skin helps both with survivability and you don't spend a turn activating it. Dissolve pumps out good damage, and slathers on applied effects. Corrosive Breath has good damage, and disarms are helpful.
  • Higher Draconic: 5/1/4/5
    Max the tier 1 for 12% attack speed bonus, venom breath works fine with 1 point in, wyrmic guile stops lowering cooldowns at 4/5 and we can cover the slightly lowered resists with equipment. Chromatic Fury for damage, but you could take this one 0 and put the points somewhere else like buffing up Guile to the full 5/5, and up Corrosive Mist to get the best out if that on top of Icy Skin.
  • Combat Training: 5/5/3/5/0
    Thick Skin is never out of place, maxed armor to be tanky, 3 points in combat accuracy because the rest can be covered by equipment, 5 in weapon mastery so our everything hits harder.
  • Call of the Wild: 1/1/1/4
    Meditation is obvious but a one-point wonder. We get our instant heal from Fungus, Earth's Eyes is a utility and we don't make good enough use of ambush tactics and battlefield prep to need it above 1 point, Nature's Balance is a great panic button for a once-per-engage 'ALL POWER TO WEAPONS'.
  • Fungus: 5/1/5/1
    Regen forever, regen for equilibrium, regen for life. Activate Wild Growth, set it to keep itself on no matter what, and set up your regen infusions to be perpetually ticking.

This leaves us with 9 generic points for usage in anti-magic, harmony, race, or whatever. There's also ways to get generic points (at least another 5) in the game, 0 class points, and 2 category points. One of which is almost deffinitely going into inscriptions.

Stats minimums:
  • STR: 44
  • DEX: 00
  • CON: (59)30
  • MAG: 00
  • WIL: 44
  • CUN: 00
I do not believe it should be too difficult to get CON a temporary 29 point boost late game. This leaves us 71 stat points (by level 50) to play with, and that IS counting your level 1 expendatures. So feel free to rely on equipment for additional scaling, or max STR for best scaling, and pump CUN or DEX or even CON if you can't find any good gear. You have plenty to still be able to unlock what you need, at least. You can also spend fewer points if your race has a bonus to certain stats that you use.

Strategy
This is probably the classic Wyrmic, based upon Goon's guide on the wiki, and known here and there as the 'standard'. Run 'n bump the chaff using Swallow whenever it's off cooldown. If you max it early you can actually eat things from full health in teir 1 dungeons very frequently. We're good at clearing rooms, holding chokepoints, and surviving prolonged battle thanks to our constantly ticking regen effects. We can engage and disengage incredibly easily, kite with increase movespeed, attack frequently and powerfully, and stunlock important enemies like casters, bosses, or uniques. Using Lightning Speed, we're able to enter a room, select our target, position, and open up a can of hurt before more than one or two turns can pass for everyone else. We can then psychoport out if necessary, sit with meditation on till our cooldowns come off, then do it again. Our only real threats are burst damage and something stopping our sustains / infusions, but even an oozing horror and stuns for days won't entirely kill us due to incredible levels of tank, and good damage output. A good way to end a lightning speed is with our confusion AOE confusion, followed with our blind and disarm breaths. A stunning blow, dissolve, and swallow later, and our breath weapons are off cooldown. Dicier encounters are largely the same, but save Lighting Speed as the escape. Pro-tip: movement Infusions will be interrupted by using lightning speed, but the temporary immunity to pinning etc. will not be...

Prodigies
Admittedly this is a grey area for me. I've never actually gotten them. From appearances however, Draconic Will and Draconic Body both seem obvious choices. Superpower also synergizes well with... everything we have.

Harrier
This is a sub-optimal theoretical build and favors fleeting encounters and a lot of room to move and escape, relying upon the lack of healing most enemies offer. Our move-speed and Lightning Speed make disengagements simple, and very little can outrun a fleeing 5/5 lightning speed wyrmic, even without the skill being active. You never want to be in a battle very long with your skill set, but small groups or weaker enemies can be simply be attacked or killed as usual. Consider a bow if you find some arrows / bow with nice on-hit debuffs or effects, and can survive without the damage increases. I do not know how skills with weapon damage scalings handle bows, however. Do keep in mind this is a THEORETICAL build. I do NOT reccomend this one. I don't even know if this one is possible to win with. It would be, in my mind, interesting to play though. It has been suggested this particular build may not be entirely viable, but no reason why has been submitted yet. Review the comments, and use this as a suggestion rather than a rule.

  • Combat Veteran: 1/1/5/0
    I only suggest this because a harrier playstyle prefers kiting and avoiding close range engagements, and that means you don't need the melee investments. Being able to avoid all the nasty debuff spells instead keeps us nice and mobile.
  • Sand: 1/5/4/0
    The lack of crit makes me sad but again you don't want to be closer than necessary. Quake is a knockback and rearranges the battlefield to allow you to more easily escape or change an engagement. Burrow taken to instant to make an escape through a wall, which incidentally sets up a nice chokepoint. No breath because we need the points elsewhere.
  • Fire: 1/1/1/3
    Wing Buffet gets a bit more use here than normal, pushing things away to open an escape. Bellowing Roar can be levelled further if you like, but even at 1 point it's a nice way of stalling before you run, or as you unload. Devouring Flame is tax for Fire Breath, which is a nice high damage DoT so we can fire it and it'll do it's job.
  • Cold: 5/1/5/0
    Ice Claw is for saves to keep moving, and it's a potent short-ranged cone weapon too, with a chance to freeze and let you flee or continue the engagement. Icy Skin is nice but you would hopefully not be in range of it being entirely useful. Ice Wall is how you stop and prevent things from following you. Either as a barrier in something's way, or along your escape route to ensure whoever's falling you is almost guaranteed to be frozen.
  • Storm: 5/1/3/3
    A bit of a weird one. We get our 5/5 lightning speed we're built around, which is both for movement passive and active. Static Field is not useful to this playtype, but tornado can open paths, and makes a good (if short range) bomb. I would max it if I had the chance. Lightning Breath is one of our disengage options, relying upon the daze chance to pin them down while we escape. Unfortunately the daze isn't reliable, and there's only 3 points there so we have some form of damage output along our other tools.
  • Venom: 5/0/0/0
    Acid Spray raises our mind-power which makes itself a bit more powerful, but we're maxing it because it's a longer range low cooldown debuff beam that deals decent enough damage. We shouldn't be close enough for Dissolve or Corrosive Mist, and we're already getting direly low on points.
  • Higher Draconic: 5/5/4/0
    The rest of our points. The first skill IS melee, but it's a speed booster, which we're into, and gives us a short range tool along with Ice Claw. It puts out a nice chunk of damage too. Venom Breath gets no love but it actually yields the most damage of any of our breath weapons, done over time. It also has a nice chance to keep anything from acting dangerously, even if said chance is a bit low. Best of all, we could keep applying it, as the duration lasts as long as it's cooldown with 4/5 of wyrmic guile. At our bare minimums with no other bonuses, venom breath offers 372 total damage per cast, and since we plan on spending very little time in a fight at a go, that's significant.
  • Combat Training: 5/5/2/5/0
    Why 5 on weapon mastery? Because you do need a backup way of dealing with things, and this also makes our skills hurt more. Lower accuracy given all our AOE attacks.
  • Call of the Wild: 1/1/4/4
    Meditation is bog standard, Nature's touch utility and tax, track is pointed up so we have much better map awareness, and if we're digging with Burrow or just in general, we can see what's in a room we're about to breach, and plan accordingly. Nature's Balance allows us to reset cooldowns, and as long as we have a safe area or enough room to kite the requisite 50 turns, we can keep using it. As long as we don't have more than 6 of our skills on cooldown at any time during an engage, we can instantly take Lightning Speed off cooldown, and use it to bug out, and get enough distance for everything to be ready again.
  • Fungus: 5/1/5/1
    Industry standard. Things will still hit at range, whether they be mages, rushes, or archers, this keeps us alive and tanky enough to survive should things turn south.

This leaves us with 2 category points, and 7 generic points, along with whatever else you can scrounge up during play.

Stat Minimums
  • STR: 44
  • DEX: 00
  • CON: (59)30
  • MAG: 00
  • WIL: 54
  • CUN: 10

Consider taking Dexterity rather than Cunning to pick up a nice bow if you see one that's good enough for your off-set. I suggest a stat-stick two handed to keep skills hitting hard.

Strategy
Once again, this is a reminder that the Harrier is a theoretical setup, and has several shortcomings that you would need to overcome through equipment, in-game talent point acquisitions, and luck. That said, this particular setup (provided it can get going) gives us tools to break off a fight whenever we want, start it on our own terms, deal bursts of damage, and then escape letting them weaken and/or die during our resting periods. Ideally a level will begin with meditation on, and Earth's Eyes cast almost immediately to get a view of the surrounding layout. If things are surrounding the stairs, you're in for a rough time. Wing Buffet or Quake and look for someplace to hide awhile. Ice Wall has (maxed) only a 5 turn window where there's no barrier, but a lucky quake can actually completely block off a door with a wall. If it's clear, we slowly explore the level and take things out at range with Acid Spray, breaths, and DoTs, using knockback, infusions, or superior speed to keep from getting mobbed since we have a weaker (but not nonexistant) melee presence. When we run into groups, try to approach in a way that will let you gauge their threat without pulling their attention first. Earth's Eyes's ESP is good for this, as is Track if you can get it from an escort. Barring that (and if you aren't antimagic) wand of clairvoyance isn't a bad choice either. You have the tools to control an engagement after all. Venom Breath is a good engage AND finisher if you don't need (or can't use) Lightning Breath's daze to back off. As an engage it lowers the chance of anything being able to cast, rush, or whatever, and we can easily spend 6 turns dumping our other damage dealers out before retreating on the 7th. Our biggest threats are pins (get an immunity from something ASAP!), and burst damage, as with other wyrmics. Beyond that you (theoretically) should be able to whittle down most opposition. In closed areas where you don't have the ability to move much (ambushes, Weirdling, some boss fights...) you aren't helpless, and with ice wall and knockbacks, can control how much can engage you at once. Freezes and dazes can let you pick off targets. Points you come by should be spent on pumping up anything in your kit that you find useful, but I wouldn't get anything entirely new.

Prodigies
Fast As Lightning is pretty much built for Lightning Speed. It combines probability travel with a movement infusion and all you need is a bit of room to get started. Hey-- doesn't wing buffet have a max knockback of 3 tiles...? Draconic Will is good to activate just before we need to run, Unbreakable Will is a nice passive, and Spine of the World is too. Comes down to what you prefer.

Bump-Master
Sometimes we want to play a warrior that just bumps things to death. Sometimes we want that warrior to have rediculous tools at their disposal to make encountering them a nightmare. Wyrmic's generics even without including much in the way of class skills makes it tanky with high surviability in long engagements, this THEORETICAL build should be able to capitalize upon that, and focuses largely on making your attacks a force to be reckoned with. It has been suggested this particular build may not be entirely viable, but no reason why has been submitted yet. Review the comments, and use this as a suggestion rather than a rule.

  • Shield Offense: 4/1/5/1
    Why shields and not 2-hand for this? Because we want to be able to hang out in the thick of it and the extra armor / block is nice. Counterstrike is also rather deadly. With some nice stuns, crits on demand, and a good means of attacking while defending, we're almost an off-brand bulwark.
  • Combat Veteran: 1/1/0/0
    I don't THINK you should need anything beyond this in this tree. Some extra early game survivability and stamina regen.
  • Sand: 5/5/5/5
    This entire tree feeds the bump playstyle. Swallow gives 12% free crit chance and works as an execute and heal, Quake is a massive high damage AOE weapon-scaling encounter changer that can break long lines of sight when used near walls, and costs enemies turns besides moving back toward you. Burrow is at 5 for the lower cooldown, instant use, armor and resist bypass, and the ability to escape Quake's nonsense when it inevitably causes something not nice. Sand Breath is a blind, good damage, hits all the things. And all of this together gives us the 10% free resist physical.
  • Fire: 1/5/5/0
    DEVOURING FLAME AT 5 WHAT?! Hear me out. Bellowing Roar is an obvious choice, and confuse is good. Devouring Flame, though, can be dropped at our feet, anywhere in view, and treated as a massive DoT debuff, which INSANELY steroids our health recovery on TOP of our regen, and it lasts a whole 10 turns, with 10 turns between use. This setup means we should be able to facetank almost anything as long as it doesn't eat our health bar in one shot.
  • Cold: 1/5/0/0
    Icy Skin for extra armor tankiness, and extra damage to everything fighting us.
  • Storm: 5/0/0/0
    You know the drill by now. Lightning Speed is amazing.
  • Venom: 0/0/0/0
    I really would like to put points in dissolve here and corrosive mist, but they're needed elsewhere, and everyone uses those two anyway. Besides, between Burrow and Devouring Flame, we have a good DoT that lasts longer, makes us tankier, bypasses more armor, and dissolve... Well unfortunately we have to fall back on shield slam, assault, etc.
  • Higher Draconic: 5/1/4/0
    A great melee attack with a random element and a burst, our lovely attack speed boost, venom breath a decent single point cripple for a few turns if we want to use it, and the breath weapon cooldown of wyrmic guile (with resists of course).
  • Combat Training: 5/5/3/5/0
    Pretty standard by now, maybe put a few more in combat accuracy if you really want or need to.
  • Call of the Wild: 1/1/1/0
    Why so low and no cooldown resets? Well, with our focus on attacking we shouldn't NEED it, and we'll need the generics elsewhere. Still these three points give us good utility for the investment.
  • Fungus: 5/1/5/1
    Regen for days, with a potentially very significant spike heal if needed. It really shouldn't be needed, except perhaps when Devouring Flame is running low on nearby things to fuel your healing alongside your regens.

Stat Minimums
  • STR: 44
  • DEX: 00
  • CON: (59)30
  • MAG: 00
  • WIL: 54
  • CUN: 00

Same as the others as far as minimums go. Max STR of course, but beyond that, whatever you feel you'd like. Cunning's good for more crits.

Strategy
We've left ourselves a good 16 generic points for Antimagic, and we'll need them. Extra class points I would put into Ice Claw or crawl up Venom into Dissolve as much as I could. Beyond that though, we're focusing on holding choke-points (or making them) using our shield hwen needed, and just hammering attacks into their faces while being healed ludicrous sums from the wash of monsters trying to get at us. Devouring Flame's skill points are... debatable, but the size of the effect and the damage of each tick directly relates to our MAXIMUM healing we can get from that skill per turn. The Sand tree gives us lots of tools to wreck (and eat) face in close range, we have some nice debuffs and self buffs, and the bare minimum of mobility and then some as long as we have a pickaxe.

Prodigies
Superpower for MOAR SMASH, and the other depends on what you find you need. Spell Feedback is a nice one to hurt magic-users though. Lucky Day would spike crit rate a good amount, too.

Wyrmic Proven Playstyles
So you may have noticed the above disclaimer that the previous entries were not intended to be guides, so much as ideas for ways to play the class and possible ways to build them. If not, here it is again. The previous section was entitled 'potential' because they are either unproven, or incomplete in detail. This section is intended to house volunteered guides or information.

None yet.

In Closing
My goodness that was longer than I thought it would be! I do hope this is helpful (and accurate!) to readers, and I do hope others will point out errors and fallacies. I haven't won, but that doesn't mean I can't help collect the tools that'll help others do so. In writing this guide, I helped solidify my own understanding of the class, and in posting it, I will be opening myself to improvement and input. The ultiamte goal here is to create an up-to-date (as of 1.4.3) of the class itself, rather than one way of playing it. It's easy to tell someone 'do this this and this', but I think it's better to understand why, so you can apply the knowledge elsewhere, and experiment.

...
...
Are they gone?

Snowhite has canceled job: Make Guide. Exhausted.


Last edited by Snow on Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:35 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:24 pm 
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Cornac

Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2016 8:34 pm
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Community Tips and Suggestions
Things of note or too short to write an entire section on myself, but which are relevant to the class.

General
General tips such as equipment, helpful escort rewards, things to watch for, and pitfalls to avoid.

Davion Fuxa
Quote:
Mindstars - Mindstars can be an interesting pickup for Wyrmics. Due to the synergy between a Wyrmics desired stats and using mindstars, picking up Mindstar Mastery can be a great pickup. Additionally, if forgoing anything in the Two-Handed Assault or Shield Offense categories, you can run around with a one handed weapon and a mindstar.

Specific Mention - Eye of the Wyrm, a Mindstar Artefact that greatly helps out Wyrmics.


anathema
Quote:
About wild growth+icy skin. I would personally recommend against activating both early game, and just sticking with wild growth for awhile. At 1 point, icy skin is certainly not worth it, so you need to invest a decent amount into it to even think about using it early, however the armor is not great, and with little armor hardiness is even less useful. At the same time, the life% will in the early game add an amount comparable to what you can get on 1 piece of equipment. The downside is the fail chance you get from the increased equilibrium, and thats a fatal downside if your natures touch fails when it counts. Add to that the point investment and there is my point; its not worth it. Icy skin is by no means bad, but the cost is quite high early on, and its better saved for sometime in the mid game (imo). You could go for a build that hardly uses equilibrium stuff early on and ignore most of the downside, and then it would probably be useful early.


Builds
Things a bit too lacking in detail or incomplete to list under 'Proven Playstyles'

Atarlost
Quote:
The actual working builds are the breath caster, the Bulwark+, the mind caster, and elemental theme builds.

In general each aspect has some crowd control, a boosted melee attack (except storm), and a breath. You can generally afford to heavily invest two or three. Watch the breakpoints. Very often the 5th point is wasted. Utility is heavily concentrated in sand and physical is never 100% resisted (all is sometimes 100% resisted by gimmick monsters, but physical shouldn't be unless something's gone wrong) because to do so would make pure stamina classes unplayable. So Sand should always be one of your aspects. Pick any other one or two. It doesn't really matter. It pays to stick within two or three aspects plus higher draconic except for picking up a couple points in lightning speed because you aren't wasting points on tax talents. Every tax talent could have been something you built around if you weren't trying to spread yourself too thin.

The breath caster, of course, just beelines the breaths and does nothing else beyond the minimums to survive. There's an old guide dedicated to this and it still works. Nothing's been nerfed except that it might predate the position switch on bellowing roar and wing buffet.

The Bulwark+ skimps on wisdom as much as possible and focuses on str/dex/cun instead for maximum exploitation of accuracy bonuses with Combat Techniques instead. The first talent in each aspect except venom is good and gives a good passive but only sand and higher are really worth investing up the tree for this build. When stat boosting items permit breaths are worth taking if you have class points remaining since you're investing in strength anyways. Nothing stops you from doing this with two handed instead of sword and shield, but you'll still play more like a bulwark than the current 'zerk since you don't have unstoppable.

The mindcaster wields mindstars, which will cut into melee damage and strength is a useless stat until you get the superpower prodigy. Venom and storm are the primary aspects because they have mindpowers up front. Ice and fire have ice wall and devouring flames respectively, but they're deeper in with two tax talents each. Sand is actually iffy for this kind of build.


Races
A general or specific view of all races' compatibility with Wyrmic, or how well specific races stack up.

Davion Fuxa
Quote:
On Races then:

Undead are unable to play Meta-Wilder Classes.

Cornac - Cornac don't benefit very well when playing on the Wyrmic class due to Wyrmics have a lack of locked categories to open up. Lacking Racial Talents as well, you may find you end up with Generics that you don't know what to do with.

Recommendation - Don't use Cornacs with Wyrmics.

Higher - Higher benefit a little bit more from the Wyrmic class then Cornac do, but not by much. Highborn's Bloom can be helpful in situations where you are spending lots of Equilibrium, but overall, most of the Higher's Racial Talents are less then then useful.

Recommendation - Don't use Highers for Wyrmics.

Shalore - Shalore aren't a bad choice for Wyrmics, but they aren't perhaps the best choice. Shalore are a race that benefit from faster speed, improved criticals, and the ability to use Timeless to increase the length of beneficial effects. Unfortunately, Wyrmics are one of the few classes that least benefit from all those Shalore positives - not to say they don't benefit, they do, but not as much as they would on other classes.

Recommendation - While I don't recommend against Shalore for Wyrmics, I don't recommend them.

Thalore - One of the top choices for players looking to play Wyrmics, Thalore have huge synergy to the Wyrmic class due to their Racials scaling on Willpower. The Racials themselves are very useful for adding resistances, saves and damage reduction, and on top of the Wyrmics resistances and saves can help build very durable characters. Thalore Wyrmics can likely also make any build the player chooses work as well.

Recommendation - A top choice to play Wyrmics on, pick Thalore if you want a very durable Wyrmic and don't really have any specific build in mind when playing them. Definetely recommended.

Doomelf - I've never played with Doomelves so I can't tell you how they play. Their Racial talents though look like they they could mesh well with the Wyrmic class, being able to give a mix of more defense, though likely the Doomelf wouldn't be a top choice.

Recommendation - I can't give one at this time.

Halfling - Not a bad choice for playing Wyrmics on, Halflings are great for putting out more damage on Wyrmics while offering some ability to evade some damage or being held down. If you are still new to the game, Halflings may be a better choice then the Thalore Elves to playing Wyrmics on.

Recommendation - Extremely Newbie friendly, I would recommend using Halflings offer Thalore if you are still somewhat learning the ropes to playing the game.

Dwarf - Dwarves are all about getting more Armor, which isn't a bad choice for Wyrmics since they can wield heavy armor. They also get good saves and can pick up a nice escape ability which can be useful if going Anti-magic.

Recommendation - If you are thinking about making an Anti-magic character, the Dwarf might be your best bet for it. They are good for other builds too as well but Thalore and Halfling might be better suited if going down those paths.

Yeek - Generally with Yeeks, it is less of a question of how they compare to other races and more of a question of - can I do better with this classes then other classes on a Yeek? Wyrmics are one of the few classes that a Yeek can pair with and do very well. The mix of their talents can let them sow confusion and dish out damage quickly while the Wyrmic self-regenerating ability can help you keep your low hit point pool topped off.

Recommendation - If you want to play a Yeek character, Wyrmics are a good class to play them with. I wouldn't recommend Yeek over other races suggested but - it is hard to recommend Yeek over other Races on any classes really.

Ogre - One of the few classes that can make all the Ogre Racials really shine. Want to wield a Two Handed Weapon and something in your offhand (say Eye of the Wyrmic), does more damage help a lot on Wyrmics, can you play Wyrmics in a fashion that can see them landing critcials? A lot of fun to be had if you pick the Ogre race and go Wyrmic.

Recommendation - Offers a lot of different and viable ways of playing Wyrmics in ways other races can't. Choose Ogres if you want to go in a direction that other Races can't for best results!


anathema
Quote:
About races. There is a good part personal taste involved in picking race, but i think Thalore deserves special mention. Guardian of the wood is a very powerful passive, you get a respectable health per level, and wrath of the woods can be set to auto use when enemies are visible (if you dont want to cast it manually at the best time); this all makes it a very forgiving race choice that often also happens to be one of the best for wyrmic.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 8:24 pm 
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Cornac

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Thank you.

Didn't read this yet but it will be on top of my list when I decide to give wyrmics a spin.


Last edited by grouchy on Mon Feb 08, 2016 8:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 10:58 pm 
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Sher'Tul

Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 2:39 am
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It is good to see a guide for the Wyrmics class, I'm not sure anyone has tried to write one yet since the changes to Wyrmics. Anyhow, some thoughts to look into:

Mindstars - Mindstars can be an interesting pickup for Wyrmics. Due to the synergy between a Wyrmics desired stats and using mindstars, picking up Mindstar Mastery can be a great pickup. Additionally, if forgoing anything in the Two-Handed Assault or Shield Offense categories, you can run around with a one handed weapon and a mindstar.

Specific Mention - Eye of the Wyrm, a Mindstar Artefact that greatly helps out Wyrmics.

Breath Wyrmics - Where there are Wyrmics, there should be a note about Breath-casters, players that focus their Wyrmics highly around multiple breath attack use.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 1:06 am 
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Sher'Tul Godslayer

Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2003 7:38 pm
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Those theoretical builds are not going to work. The goon build is kind of outdated, but not useless. Notably, bellowing roar is no longer accessible as early, wing buffet has become a weapon attack, most of the passives on tier 1 talents are new, the scaling on lightning speed has changed (it's now a 2 point low breakpoint instead of 3), and heals are now instant. The last impacts the fungus tree in that it doesn't need deep investment as early. You don't need ancestral life to get back turns, just to regen equilibrium. Fungal growth is still a 1 point wonder. Wild growth, though, is a lot less important because less of the healing is in the form of regen. Sudden growth stops being good. Heal infusions can have lower cooldowns than regen infusions and wind up with comparable heal/turn. The downside is that you can't run heal on auto the way you can regen because it doesn't wait to activate when you aren't regenerating anymore. The upside of not being on autopilot is that you get the partial (or eventually full) turn back on swallow. You could probably get away with going as low as 1/1/5/0 and can run 1/1/1/0 for a while if you have other places to invest. Like the shalore or ogre racials or an escort tree.

The actual working builds are the breath caster, the Bulwark+, the mind caster, and elemental theme builds.

In general each aspect has some crowd control, a boosted melee attack (except storm), and a breath. You can generally afford to heavily invest two or three. Watch the breakpoints. Very often the 5th point is wasted. Utility is heavily concentrated in sand and physical is never 100% resisted (all is sometimes 100% resisted by gimmick monsters, but physical shouldn't be unless something's gone wrong) because to do so would make pure stamina classes unplayable. So Sand should always be one of your aspects. Pick any other one or two. It doesn't really matter. It pays to stick within two or three aspects plus higher draconic except for picking up a couple points in lightning speed because you aren't wasting points on tax talents. Every tax talent could have been something you built around if you weren't trying to spread yourself too thin.

The breath caster, of course, just beelines the breaths and does nothing else beyond the minimums to survive. There's an old guide dedicated to this and it still works. Nothing's been nerfed except that it might predate the position switch on bellowing roar and wing buffet.

The Bulwark+ skimps on wisdom as much as possible and focuses on str/dex/cun instead for maximum exploitation of accuracy bonuses with Combat Techniques instead. The first talent in each aspect except venom is good and gives a good passive but only sand and higher are really worth investing up the tree for this build. When stat boosting items permit breaths are worth taking if you have class points remaining since you're investing in strength anyways. Nothing stops you from doing this with two handed instead of sword and shield, but you'll still play more like a bulwark than the current 'zerk since you don't have unstoppable.

The mindcaster wields mindstars, which will cut into melee damage and strength is a useless stat until you get the superpower prodigy. Venom and storm are the primary aspects because they have mindpowers up front. Ice and fire have ice wall and devouring flames respectively, but they're deeper in with two tax talents each. Sand is actually iffy for this kind of build.

On specific talents I think you seriously misunderstand:

Fearless cleave isn't a 3 target sweep for piddling damage. It's the ability to move 1 tile for no action cost whatsoever before making an attack. The ranged AI will try to get out of melee with you, often by backing up. This is normally smart, but not when you have FC. FC lets you keep dealing damage while forcing enemies to keep wasting their turns backing up. Hiding around a corner far enough to be out of LoS puts you 2 tiles from where an enemy will come into LoS of you. Without FC or rush they get a free hit on you if they're ranged (and who else would you want to hide from LoS of?) With FC you get right into their face and hit them and then the ranged AI starts backing up. The movement isn't a weakness, it's the whole point of the talent. It's still a one pointer, but it's a wonder not a tax.

Fire breath has a dirty little secret: flameshock doesn't effect stun immune opponents and that includes the damage component. A bunch of important bosses are stun immune and 25% of the time fire breath doesn't effect them at all. Accounting for that the damage isn't so great.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 1:22 am 
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Sher'Tul

Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 2:39 am
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Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
I thought about some more considerations you might want to look into.

Race Selection - Definitely worthy of noting if you are doing an Exhaustive Guide, some Races are very good with Wyrmics, some are less worthy of Consideration.

Escorts & Their Rewards - It might be worth going into a bit of detail regarding Escorts, giving some insight on what Escort Categories might be worth picking up.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 2:07 am 
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Spiderkin

Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 1:12 am
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Atarlost wrote:
Fire breath has a dirty little secret: flameshock doesn't effect stun immune opponents and that includes the damage component. A bunch of important bosses are stun immune and 25% of the time fire breath doesn't effect them at all. Accounting for that the damage isn't so great.

Thankfully, it doesn't work like that - if Fire Breath procs stun it adds an extra 15 damage/turn flameshock effect on top of its base burn. It's also worth noting that 70% of its damage is upfront compared to the 50% of other fireburn attacks.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 5:40 am 
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Cornac

Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2016 8:34 pm
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Davion Fuxa wrote:
I thought about some more considerations you might want to look into.

Race Selection - Definitely worthy of noting if you are doing an Exhaustive Guide, some Races are very good with Wyrmics, some are less worthy of Consideration.

Escorts & Their Rewards - It might be worth going into a bit of detail regarding Escorts, giving some insight on what Escort Categories might be worth picking up.


If you would like to volunteer information on either of these subjects I would be happy to add it to the guide. As I said before, I'm not all that experienced with the game. In my opinion race selection is about personal taste, since you don't ever have to actually use the racial tree, and if I was going to sit down and look that closely at each race, I'd make a guide dedicated to races themselves. Which I might in the future when I've actually played enough of each to know what I'm talking about. As for escorts... I suppose I could, but again, I'd feel better if others gave their own views instead, as sometimes I will look at the escort rewards and just go 'Screw it' and up stats with them because they don't seem entirely helpful.

Davion Fuxa wrote:
Mindstars - Mindstars can be an interesting pickup for Wyrmics. Due to the synergy between a Wyrmics desired stats and using mindstars, picking up Mindstar Mastery can be a great pickup. Additionally, if forgoing anything in the Two-Handed Assault or Shield Offense categories, you can run around with a one handed weapon and a mindstar.

Specific Mention - Eye of the Wyrm, a Mindstar Artefact that greatly helps out Wyrmics.


I'd rather not mention specific items if I'm honest, but I will mention mindstar if I can work up the motivation to write a full new build. Still these kinds of comments are why I posted this.

Atarlost wrote:
Those theoretical builds are not going to work. The goon build is kind of outdated, but not useless. Notably, bellowing roar is no longer accessible as early, wing buffet has become a weapon attack, most of the passives on tier 1 talents are new, the scaling on lightning speed has changed (it's now a 2 point low breakpoint instead of 3), and heals are now instant. The last impacts the fungus tree in that it doesn't need deep investment as early. You don't need ancestral life to get back turns, just to regen equilibrium. Fungal growth is still a 1 point wonder. Wild growth, though, is a lot less important because less of the healing is in the form of regen. Sudden growth stops being good. Heal infusions can have lower cooldowns than regen infusions and wind up with comparable heal/turn. The downside is that you can't run heal on auto the way you can regen because it doesn't wait to activate when you aren't regenerating anymore. The upside of not being on autopilot is that you get the partial (or eventually full) turn back on swallow. You could probably get away with going as low as 1/1/5/0 and can run 1/1/1/0 for a while if you have other places to invest. Like the shalore or ogre racials or an escort tree.


Correct, wing buffet is a weapon attack, but it's not a very high-scaling one, and the strength of the KNOCKBACK effect does not scale at all, either in distance knocked back, or chance to be knocked back. That's the failing I was pointing out that makes it more of a single point investment even if you're focusing on fire. Lightning Speed does have a gap but a breakpoint makes it sound like it stops scaling entirely in a meaningful way. The reason I keep reccomending it 5/5 is because even if the duration has a gap, the speed boost both active and passive keeps going up.

Please supply more detailed information if you find a proposed build to not be viable, and it will be added to the guide, or existing builds will be altered. General information such as 'they will not work' doesn't help me edit. As for the fungus comments, I will consider adding a note that early investment is not as important, given the availability of 'Heal' infusions which don't add turns. Still, I see no change or mechanic that prevents the regen infusion method from being viable, even if not optimal. As for Sudden Growth being good... I haven't honestly gotten to the point where I'd use it more than other forms of heal, but it still serves as a one-point-wonder by the numbers, since it doesn't actually STOP the regen effect, it just gives you a sudden heal based upon it. So you could, for example, use a Heal infusion, a few turns later while you're regenning off of that use Sudden Growth, and get another instant heal. Here's some numbers: 100 hp heal. Let's say Fungal Growth is giving us 35% regen rate. So 6 turns of 35 hp (35% of 100 is 35), so that will turn our heal infusion into a total heal of (100+(35*6))=310 hp. Now let's say on the last turn of that you activate Sudden Growth, which does admittedly take a turn, but this multiplies your regen rate by 6.1 at just a single point, yielding an additional 213.5 hp heal. What this means is, just running 1/1/1/1 can turn a 100 hp heal, into 523.5 hp heals, spread out over some time. Wild Growth's regen extension turns the 210 initial regen (35*6) into 350 points of regen, constantly ticking, for a 450 hp regen, and add the original heal in and you have a total of 550 hp of healing from the use of a single infusion. As a 'passive' effect.. No it's not AS necessary but if you like to be constantly regenning hilarious amounts of life per turn *and keep your heal infusions for an emergency* it should still work.

Atarlost wrote:
The actual working builds are the breath caster, the Bulwark+, the mind caster, and elemental theme builds.

In general each aspect has some crowd control, a boosted melee attack (except storm), and a breath. You can generally afford to heavily invest two or three. Watch the breakpoints. Very often the 5th point is wasted. Utility is heavily concentrated in sand and physical is never 100% resisted (all is sometimes 100% resisted by gimmick monsters, but physical shouldn't be unless something's gone wrong) because to do so would make pure stamina classes unplayable. So Sand should always be one of your aspects. Pick any other one or two. It doesn't really matter. It pays to stick within two or three aspects plus higher draconic except for picking up a couple points in lightning speed because you aren't wasting points on tax talents. Every tax talent could have been something you built around if you weren't trying to spread yourself too thin.

The breath caster, of course, just beelines the breaths and does nothing else beyond the minimums to survive. There's an old guide dedicated to this and it still works. Nothing's been nerfed except that it might predate the position switch on bellowing roar and wing buffet.

The Bulwark+ skimps on wisdom as much as possible and focuses on str/dex/cun instead for maximum exploitation of accuracy bonuses with Combat Techniques instead. The first talent in each aspect except venom is good and gives a good passive but only sand and higher are really worth investing up the tree for this build. When stat boosting items permit breaths are worth taking if you have class points remaining since you're investing in strength anyways. Nothing stops you from doing this with two handed instead of sword and shield, but you'll still play more like a bulwark than the current 'zerk since you don't have unstoppable.

The mindcaster wields mindstars, which will cut into melee damage and strength is a useless stat until you get the superpower prodigy. Venom and storm are the primary aspects because they have mindpowers up front. Ice and fire have ice wall and devouring flames respectively, but they're deeper in with two tax talents each. Sand is actually iffy for this kind of build.


Thank you for these suggestions! I don't feel up to making entire, detailed builds added to the post based around them at this point in time, but if you're willing to expand upon the details in any / each, I'll format it and add it, then credit you for the design. One note though: I wouldn't say Strength is 'useless' since the Breath attacks (and I think a few others? I forget) scale off of Strength alone, not weapon damage.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 7:54 am 
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Higher

Joined: Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:54 pm
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This is like when my toothless and eye-mad uncle gave me investment advice after 10 years living in a river. Fantastic!

(actually this is an admirable efort - the game itself moves faster than guides and wikis can keep up with, so a new treatise is probably in order. I'll be giving it a read after experienced players have had their say!)


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 8:31 am 
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Sher'Tul Godslayer

Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2003 7:38 pm
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Wing buffet's knockback is practically irrelevant since knockback fails when someone else is behind the target. The range scales. It applies weapon damage+ with all the riders that entails to a large group of enemies. Unlike earthquake it does so when you're not in the middle of them.

The number of targets in a room you can hit with a cone is proportional to the density of targets in the room multiplied by the square of the cone's range. There's some generous rounding as to what is in and not in the cone, but it's definitely more than linear. Wing buffet has twice the range of ice claw.

Oh, another thing to cover is category points. If you don't unlock combat techniques or an escort category wyrmics wind up with an extra category point even on non-cornacs.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:06 pm 
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Cornac

Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2016 8:34 pm
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Atarlost wrote:
Wing buffet's knockback is practically irrelevant since knockback fails when someone else is behind the target. The range scales. It applies weapon damage+ with all the riders that entails to a large group of enemies. Unlike earthquake it does so when you're not in the middle of them.

The number of targets in a room you can hit with a cone is proportional to the density of targets in the room multiplied by the square of the cone's range. There's some generous rounding as to what is in and not in the cone, but it's definitely more than linear. Wing buffet has twice the range of ice claw.

Oh, another thing to cover is category points. If you don't unlock combat techniques or an escort category wyrmics wind up with an extra category point even on non-cornacs.


Yes, wing buffet can be a cone of a moderately more powerful physical attack. But for the points you'd put in to increase it's range you have a lot of better choices since you other tools dealing a cone's worth of attack than wing buffet if a cone's single attack is all it has going for it. It's great for the one point you put in, sure. But more than one, I really wouldn't bother, personally. The knockback is the *point* of the skill, and if the knockback isn't something you need or can use, then the skill should not be invested in heavily.

By the by, the knockback is not as irrelevant as you think in principal, since wing buffet doesn't operate like tidal wave. The knockback is applied to the whole range at once, rather than the things in front first.

...Also regarding category points and every last detail of particular builds, that section was added as an example of how things can tie together to make a character. That's why I listed stat MINIMUMs there, and didn't include all of the various unlocks, items, and such that goes into making a character a game-winner, even beside the fact that I personally can't. If people want to provide that information in whole or in part, I can add it with credit and a notice that it's proven, but if detail isn't given I'm left to try to fill in the blanks. And what that means is that those guides then need to undergo review before I'd actually recommend using any of them out of the box, and I'm not sure I want to do that myself.

grooog wrote:
This is like when my toothless and eye-mad uncle gave me investment advice after 10 years living in a river. Fantastic!

(actually this is an admirable efort - the game itself moves faster than guides and wikis can keep up with, so a new treatise is probably in order. I'll be giving it a read after experienced players have had their say!)

Yes, the main part of the guide is supposed to be the actual mechanics of the class, less how to actually play it. Maybe I should change the topic title? That portion I'm fairly sure offers a good idea of the various skills, and how one might use them in a build, or things they'd need to know when considering investing in it. As for the builds, strategies, and the 'how tos'? No. I can't do that outside of theorycraft because I keep either getting careless or YASD around level 18-25. But the people who have the knowledge to build winners either do not make a note of sharing that knowledge, or don't get into any kind of detail. So I'm doing the best I can and trying to push others into offering up their own thoughts, ideas, and what they have found works.


Last edited by Snow on Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:22 pm 
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Cornac

Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2016 8:34 pm
Posts: 38
Also newly added to the main guide:
  • Clarrfication text in Fire Breath regarding flameshock effect.
  • Tweaked Fearless Cleave description to reiterate that it is not useless, and makes a viable pursuit.
  • A section for community volunteered builds and strategies, in whole or in part.
  • Use of the reserved post to house collected tips from comments and replies, with credit to who brought them forward.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 4:27 pm 
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Sher'Tul

Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 2:39 am
Posts: 1230
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
On Races then:

Undead are unable to play Meta-Wilder Classes.

Cornac - Cornac don't benefit very well when playing on the Wyrmic class due to Wyrmics have a lack of locked categories to open up. Lacking Racial Talents as well, you may find you end up with Generics that you don't know what to do with.

Recommendation
- Don't use Cornacs with Wyrmics.

Higher - Higher benefit a little bit more from the Wyrmic class then Cornac do, but not by much. Highborn's Bloom can be helpful in situations where you are spending lots of Equilibrium, but overall, most of the Higher's Racial Talents are less then then useful.

Recommendation - Don't use Highers for Wyrmics.

Shalore - Shalore aren't a bad choice for Wyrmics, but they aren't perhaps the best choice. Shalore are a race that benefit from faster speed, improved criticals, and the ability to use Timeless to increase the length of beneficial effects. Unfortunately, Wyrmics are one of the few classes that least benefit from all those Shalore positives - not to say they don't benefit, they do, but not as much as they would on other classes.

Recommendation - While I don't recommend against Shalore for Wyrmics, I don't recommend them.

Thalore - One of the top choices for players looking to play Wyrmics, Thalore have huge synergy to the Wyrmic class due to their Racials scaling on Willpower. The Racials themselves are very useful for adding resistances, saves and damage reduction, and on top of the Wyrmics resistances and saves can help build very durable characters. Thalore Wyrmics can likely also make any build the player chooses work as well.

Recommendation
- A top choice to play Wyrmics on, pick Thalore if you want a very durable Wyrmic and don't really have any specific build in mind when playing them. Definetely recommended.

Doomelf - I've never played with Doomelves so I can't tell you how they play. Their Racial talents though look like they they could mesh well with the Wyrmic class, being able to give a mix of more defense, though likely the Doomelf wouldn't be a top choice.

Recommendation - I can't give one at this time.

Halfling - Not a bad choice for playing Wyrmics on, Halflings are great for putting out more damage on Wyrmics while offering some ability to evade some damage or being held down. If you are still new to the game, Halflings may be a better choice then the Thalore Elves to playing Wyrmics on.

Recommendation - Extremely Newbie friendly, I would recommend using Halflings offer Thalore if you are still somewhat learning the ropes to playing the game.

Dwarf - Dwarves are all about getting more Armor, which isn't a bad choice for Wyrmics since they can wield heavy armor. They also get good saves and can pick up a nice escape ability which can be useful if going Anti-magic.

Recommendation - If you are thinking about making an Anti-magic character, the Dwarf might be your best bet for it. They are good for other builds too as well but Thalore and Halfling might be better suited if going down those paths.

Yeek - Generally with Yeeks, it is less of a question of how they compare to other races and more of a question of - can I do better with this classes then other classes on a Yeek? Wyrmics are one of the few classes that a Yeek can pair with and do very well. The mix of their talents can let them sow confusion and dish out damage quickly while the Wyrmic self-regenerating ability can help you keep your low hit point pool topped off.

Recommendation - If you want to play a Yeek character, Wyrmics are a good class to play them with. I wouldn't recommend Yeek over other races suggested but - it is hard to recommend Yeek over other Races on any classes really.

Ogre - One of the few classes that can make all the Ogre Racials really shine. Want to wield a Two Handed Weapon and something in your offhand (say Eye of the Wyrmic), does more damage help a lot on Wyrmics, can you play Wyrmics in a fashion that can see them landing critcials? A lot of fun to be had if you pick the Ogre race and go Wyrmic.

Recommendation - Offers a lot of different and viable ways of playing Wyrmics in ways other races can't. Choose Ogres if you want to go in a direction that other Races can't for best results!

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Its amazing what the mind can come up with, but it shows talent to make something of it. - Davion Fuxa
Inscription Guide - Version 1.4.8
Let's Learn Tales of Maj'Eyal


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 5:00 pm 
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Cornac

Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2016 8:34 pm
Posts: 38
Thank you very much! I'm adding this to the community section now.


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